6 Signs That You're Pissing Your Life Away and 6 Ways To Stop It Now. | Be F-ing Awesome Today google4228e52aa5dfebc8.html

6 Signs That You’re Pissing Your Life Away and 6 Ways To Stop It Now.

Do what you love. Period.

How to stop wasting time and make the time to do what you love.

Is this your problem?

“I can’t find time to do what I love.”

Sorry to be harsh, but here’s the answer: Balderdash!

It may be semantics, but change “find” to “make” and we have a new ballgame people.

The timeline in life is only so long, and there’s no telling how many years we get to play the game. So don’t spend it sitting on the bench, wishing, hoping, dreaming, that someday you’ll get to play ball, while watching those around swing for the fences.

This game of life allows the choice to do something that excites us and fulfills us during the time we’ve been granted. Best of all, exploring what we love to do offers the potential to leave the world a slightly better place for our passing through it.

See? Doing what you love benefits us all!

We’re living with outdated employment models. The rule was to get an education. Work at job for 40 years. Then you’ve earned the reward of retirement to (finally!) do something you love.

Sure it works for some people. Just not me, or you.

The alternative is to reorganize your life to make time to do the things you love, NOW, before…you know.

Your Monday through Friday life is probably crazy, busy, over booked and stressful. It’s a struggle to get through the must-do’s let alone make selfish time to get to the love to do’s.

What’s at stake?

Not much. Except your happiness. Peace of mind. Sense of self-love.

The problem is that many people leave “the good years” of life until the end of life. Maybe you’ve said (or heard someone say):

“I’ll take up golf when I retire.” In the meantime the set of clubs rusts in the basement.

“I’ll open a knitting shop, and teach people to knit, after I retire.” Maybe your arthritis won’t get worse.

“I’ll travel to Venice, Italy to take a gondola ride, when I retire.” Hopefully you’ll conquer your fear of water.

Maybe your thing isn’t so grand. You’d love to read more Romantic classics or learn calligraphy or build a chicken coop.

You get the idea. It’s what YOU love.

The only thing standing in your way is your commitment to making the time to do it. No lying, rearranging everything you’ve known to deliberately spend time doing what you love takes effort.

Don’t quit your day job?

Ever since you saw the movie Midnight in Paris you’ve dreamed of immersing yourself in the French culture. If you can’t quit your job (why not?) and move to France, start small, at home. Learn to make croissants, take a wine tasting class, plant lavender, learn a few French phrases.

Tim Ferris, in his bestselling book, The Four Hour Workweek, makes the case for mini-retirements. Recurring periods of time where work is stopped to enjoy life instead of delaying it until the end of your normal work career. A.K.A. retirement.

Plan that vacation to France. Or, take baby steps. Visit “France” at Epcot Center. Get a taste of everything French. Drink the wine. Eat the croissants. Ooh, try the chocolate filled ones.

Whatever happens in your life strive to do what you love. The flip side is watching time tick away, and it will. Funny thing: the older you get the faster it seems to pass.

So how do you know if you are pissing your life away?

Something’s missing

It’s a gnawing and nagging feeling that won’t go away. Maybe you can’t quite put your finger on what’s missing in your life but it’s there. You feel it when you’re brushing your teeth in the morning and as you plop your weary head on the pillow at night.

Deep inside you say: “Whatever is going on in my life isn’t the way I dreamed it would be.” You start humming the old Doris Day song, Que Sera Sera (whatever will be will be).

Giving up and saying things like “maybe in my next life” is total bull. The missing piece can be found and you can find it.

Information hoarding

You have this thing you want to do. So you collect brochures, read books, buy videos, surf online for the same ideas over and over. I did forever research on starting a blog, writing a novel, writing a screenplay, freelancing, opening an online store. I’ve got a vast collection of books, courses and videos, should you ever want to borrow them.

No progress ever got made until I stopped hoarding and started producing.

Green with envy

Seeing other people doing what you want to do can twist your knickers. Self-doubt moves in. Followed by every excuse. They DID IT and you DIDN’T. Stop pointing fingers and start lifting one.

Monday to Friday misery

Sunday night your stomach aches thinking of Monday. Friday morning you can’t wait for the day to end. You don’t need to read the tea leaves. You’re in the wrong place, doing the wrong thing with the wrong people. That’s why you’re miserable.

Tired of hearing yourself

After a while (years maybe) you tire of your own words. The same complaints and excuses, over and over. Another year passes and you begin to wonder IF or WHEN the time will ever be in your favor to tour the castles of France — sticking with the French theme.

Time ticks louder each day

You don’t need an expensive watch to tell time when a cheap one will do. Either makes you aware that time is ticking by. Every flip of the calendar, every birthday candle is a reminder of time you’ve left in the past. As you age, the time in front of you gets shorter. Duh.

But the urgency to finally, once and for all, stop whining about it and figure out a way to stop dreaming and start doing is running out. (See: There Is No Perfect Time)

Some tips and suggestions for finding chunks of time to do what you love.

Okay, so you’re not ready to sell the farm, leave the kids and go all Bohemian world traveler. Take little bites grasshopper.

1. Get your partner, a friend or the family involved

Let’s say you want to take a rail trip through the Canadian Rockies, “someday”.

Recruit your family and friends to do this together. Give everyone a task. Someone surfs the web for train schedules. Someone researches tips for families traveling by train. Someone writes an itinerary on the important places to visit.

2. Transition plan from a job

Whether you’re at retirement age, you’ve outgrown the position or you’re taking a mini-retirement break, there’s a few tips you should employ before you leave. Don’t burn any bridges is still good advice. Trust me, if they’re happy to see you go it won’t matter, they’ll talk about you anyway. Take the high road.

Let your boss know first.

List out any expected, pending or anticipated projects.

Offer to help train the next in line.

You’ll leave with a clear head and a clear conscience. Be sure there’s some wiggle room in the next job, if that’s where you’re headed, to do what you love.

3. Cut the crap and set priorities

If this love project of yours is really important to you (and it should be) make it a priority.

We get bogged down with a zillion stupid little time-sucking things. Most is nonsense. There’s no need to check email and social media every twenty minutes. Procrastination has killed many dreams.

4. Small bites

Focus on ten minute chunks dedicated to something is better than “wishing” and “hoping” for a full day off, a weekend or worse, retirement. (See: Take Small Steps)

5. Wake Up early

There’s plenty of information on famous entrepreneurs who get up at 4 a.m. to tackle their most important tasks before the sun rises. The Marines once ran a television campaign that said: We do more before 9 a.m. than most people do all day. Carve the first hour of the day for what you love. Get it done.

6.Make an appointment

Set a timer on your phone or plan a set time that will be devoted exclusively to your passion, goal, trip, mastering those damn French croissants — don’t you dare head over to Panera.

Write it in your calendar:

Every day at 7 p.m. I will work on my jewelry, write my novel, practice yoga…whatever.

Consider the time sacred.

In fact, penalize yourself if you skip the appointment or fail to reschedule it. That’s what many medical offices do now. Put the “fine” in a jar to help finance your thing.

Conclusion:

In an instant this life could be over. You’ve seen it happen with family and friends. And with it all their unrealized dreams.

At the risk of sounding morbid, every funeral you attend from now on should be a reminder of your own mortality. The time to think about what could have been isn’t on your death bed.

Nobody, but maybe a few lucky heirs, will give a shit how much money you left in the bank or how many toys you’ve accumulated. But everyone will know that you lived your dreams, or died trying.

Today promise yourself that not another minute will be wasted, not another excuse made, not the slightest whining allowed on why you don’t have time to do what you love.

C’est la vie! (French for “It’s life!”)

If this post helped you in anyway please share with someone you know who needs to hear this message today. I thank you so much.

BE F♥CKING AWESOME TODAY! (and every day)

Original graphic: Stephanie DelTorchio

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